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. mer "america tonight" is next. >>> what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their te
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
is a reflection of where america stands right now. according to a reuters poll, only 25% would support a military intervention. 45% oppose it, 49% don't know enough to answer. so dell, what is the objective of any military strike by the u.s.? the u.s. on record for more than a year calling for the assad regime to go but if this were to go forward, the objective would be to suppress the ability to deliver councilmember a call weapons and nothing more. >> you are now in washington and i was there yesterday and one of the things that is curious to the american public is we think all of washington is talking about syria and egypt. the truth of the matter is what they are talking about and i had a feeling yesterday that it was about back-to-school sales? >> yes, if you are going to do something in the rush hour, do it in late day and out of rush hour. the talk on the sunday shows today, largely about syria but also about the martin martin luther king anniversary as well. there doesn't seem to be a lot of focus and the principle point i should make here is congress has been out the last five weeks. the
the nation. >> what was at stake that day? >> the future of america. >> was dr. king's dream fulfilled? the powerhouse roundtable weighs in on that and all the week's politics. it's all right here this sunday morning. >> from abc news, a special edition of "this week" with martha raddatz in cairo. and jonathan karl in washington. starts right now. >>> good morning, george is off today. we're reporting from a region on the brink, and all eyes are on syria, where an apparent chemical weapons attack could lead to american military action. here in cairo, we're just 100 miles from the mediterranean sea where u.s. warships are now at the ready. this morning, officials tell abc news that u.s. navy destroyers now in the mediterranean could be used to carry out limited military strikes. cruise missile strikes, designed to deter or prevent another chemical attack by the assad regime. if this week's suspected attack is verified. >> this is clearly a big event. of grave concern. that starts getting to some core national interest that the united states has. >> president obama has so far been unwill
sought to pursue taking america into the second world war. and as michael explained, that changed the course of history as we know in very dramatic ways and in particular the role of america in very dramatic ways. and so the story is a fascinating one of itself. it's told beautifully by michael in a way that takes you into the rooms where the decisions were being made and the conversations were being had that shaped the course of history. but it also has i think important lessons about statecraft, about the way in which presidents of with great difficulty nevertheless can turn the american state and new and profoundly important directions. therefore it has relevance for today as well. michael was the director of the institute for international policy in sydney australia where he does a great job of leading that institution, which has become under his leadership the premier think tank on international policy and australia. as i said, she was formerly year as a senior fellow in the foreign policy program. he previously directed the global issues program at the institute and before t
joining forces, we are so proud of the work you've done to help rally america around military families and veterans. i'm inspired by what they're doing, so thank you, michelle, for your extraordinary work. join at was proud to your convention three years ago. [applause] it is wonderful to be back. i want to thank your national much.der, thank you so teame entire leadership johnson, burgess, don adams, all the incredible spouses and spouses that the dav auxiliary. i want to thank barry janowski. i got it. [laughter] they used to mispronounce obama, too. [laughter] i want to thank barry and your grade team in washington. disabled american veterans, like all veterans, you carry in your hearts the story of brave service that took you to every as young men earth , leftmen, you left home everyone you ever knew because clouds gathered far across the sea. you had your whole life ahead of you, but you were willing to risk all of it for this land that we love. because you know from hard experience what we must never our country and doors because in every generation there are americans like you w
and put a platform together that focuses on them. not everybody in america wants a business and money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work in community groups. spend time at their church. we, as republicans, believe that is a good thing. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an agenda of ideas to raise up folks who want to vote for us. you saw the last election. they did not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. the second thing is we need to talk less about the culture. he people who do this is those who do not want to talk about culture in the first place. as a result, do not engage as we have in this party. i will give you an exa
. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. can you say stocktopussy? g102 2 more news. ♪ >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their team. >> reporter: it's at the edge of locust grove high school football field just out of atlanta, where glen jones has the best view. his son was forrest jones, number 71 on the football team. drive. >> he was a hard worker. he just went aft
commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&t mobile share for business. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s.
muhamed who had sworn to love this as an immigrant and army sergeant enlistee to america looks at him and says i love bin laden. i don't need a wad to attack america. i've ex-met number of sleepers that i kid activate. as matthew and he walks out of the restaurant. he said that's the most dangerous man i've ever met and we cannot leave him on the street and yet they left him on the street for x. max number of months. the bombs go off in africa 200 some dead in and they wait a month. they finally arrest him and when they go to rest and guess what they do click they get them in a motel room in new york and they let him go to the bathroom. police 101. for anyone who has ever worked csi miami or dragnet noses as soon as you put the cuffs on somebody you search them or whatever. before they put the cuffs on them they let him go to the bathroom and he later admitted that he flushed key and permission down the toilet including alza were he's location the number two guy in al qaeda and guess what happened to ali muhamed? he is a john doe warrant for weeks and months because they don't want th
of the south asian political dynamic in america. that was my first event at the forum. and those it is right feel most at home here in new york in drew is modest because these books and we have done together starting over one decade ago when we will talk about why the meeting of the world social forum it was a world conference against racism and intolerance and discrimination so why was there such chaos come on the stage of the left? there never seems to be a coherent agenda. we have so many different issues in there and able to fight a united horizon. not a single horizon but some kind of unity but the first time we talk about this i said i would write a book about it be over 100 pages because of durbin was in danger of being forgotten. faugh five all that work that went to put together this major conference was in danger of the loss. i remember we matt and i said i cannot publish his book because it is a book of defeat it does not recognize there is no future for the movement. it is a swan song that never came together. said then went back where is the dynamic? what about in the venues lik
. >> reporter: before leaving on vacation president obama promised to do more work for america's disabled veterans. and he pledged those who sacrificed for this country won't lose their benefits despite washington's budget cuts. >> i believe this work is more important than ever. because this time of war that we've been in is coming to an end. >> the president hopes to have america back on a peace time footing in a year and a half. but his friday news conference showed he's fighting on a lot of political fronts. >> good afternoon, everybody, please have a seat. >> he's trying to calm the controversy over nsa surveillance. he's still battling members of congress over obama care. >> the one unifying principle in the republican party at the moment is making sure that 30 million people don't have health care. >> reporter: in martha's vineyard, president obama looking for a break from the heat. brian mooar, nbc news, washington. >>> more guns are off bay area streets tonight thanks to a gun buyback program in oakland today. the organization youth uprising partnered with the oakland police depa
. -- andrybody in america money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work and community groups. spend time at their church. we as republicans believe that is a good inc.. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. -- that is a good thing. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an upnda of ideas to raise folks who want to vote for us. you side and the last election. they do not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. --st and foremost, we need first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build to becoming, everybody will be fine. -- if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. [applause] the second inc. as we be to talk less about the culture area -- thing is we need to talk less about the culture. the people who do this is who do not want to talk about culture in the firs
tanks after hundreds of tons of water leaked out. >>> al jazeera america has kicked off in new york. some welcome a different angle on the news while others say it's biased against the u.s. >>> and the friends and family of a japanese war correspondent are remembering her one year after her death and trying to spread her message. >>> workers at the damaged fukushima daiichi plant say a leakage of contaminated water may have gone undetected for some time. they say the storage tank doesn't have a water level gauge and their monitoring may not have been adequate. workers found a puddle forming just outside a low wall surrounding tanks near reactor number four. they confirmed one of the tanks lost more than 300 tons of water. the water contains high levels of radioactive substances. officials of the tokyo electric power company says the tank has no water gauge. they say the workers didn't notice the leak in their daily inspections until they saw the puddle outside the barrier. nuclear regulators urged the utility to check 350 tanks of the same structure in the compound. >> translator: i
american game. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> i have a dream. my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. [applause] >> his words forever penned in american history. it has been 5 50 years since dr. mayor tin luther king, junior delivered his iconic i have a dream speech. this weekend tens of thousandsdiothousandsdescended o continue his vision and many warn that the advances are now in danger of being rolled back. [applause] >> the crowds in front of the lynne kl memorial did not match the 200,000 or more that watched martin luther king at the same spot a half century ago but the determination to see america redeem his vision was strong as children veronica and benisha were at the 25th anniversa
news america reporting from washington. i am jane o'briant. u.s. western inspectors are met with gunfire as they try to reach the site of a chemical attack. there is tough talk against the assad regime. >> make no mistake. president obama there must be accountability for those who would use the world most heinous weapons against the world's most honorable people. >> the high-profile trial draws to a close in china. now he also awaits the verdict. animals have long world rushes arctic oceans. oil and gas are moving and. tonight we look at the potential impact. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. a moral obscenity is what the u.s. secretary of state is accusing the assad regime of perpetrating against its own. today he ramped up the pressure by saying the syrian government was behind the use of chemical weapons last week and has now destroyed the evidence. this comes as inspectors trying to get to the scene of the alleged attack were fired on today. , watched byamascus the world, inspector set up this morning to visit one of the site of
0's ♪ and chuck hagel says the vote against military intervention in syria will not change america's strategy. hello and welcome, i'm steven in doha and this is al jazeera, coming up, one of the most prominent leader is arrested and they are pulling out from the front line in their battle against the congo army. but first united states is still planning a military response to a suspected gas attack by syrian government forces. it had expected the uk to join a possible coalition but the british parliament voted against any strikes on syria as carolyn malone reports. >> reporter: the resistance outside of the white house against the u.s. attacking syria. and the leaders look at military options and an important ally is against intervening with syria with suspected use of chemical weapons and chuck hagel says the united states still hopes to act with other allies. >> our approach is to continue to find an international coalition that will act together and i think you are seeing a number of countries say publically state their position on the use of chemical weapons. >> reporter:
. she grew up speaking english and spanish and became a hit in latin america as well. >>> eydie gorme died yesterday in los angeles. she was 84-year-old. and there is this note tonight about a hidden gem. 12-year-old michael of north carolina was on a family visit to the crater of diamond state park in arkansas when he hit genuine pay dirt. not just any diamond, but a 5.16 carat brown diamond. it's the 27th largest diamond found since the park opened back in 1972 and the 8th largest brown diamond. it's not known just how much it's worth yet. it's still in the rough. and up next sharing skilled and building a field of dreams. ,000 these champions are making a difference. these champions ara difference. these champions are difference. these champions are difference. these champions are difference. these champions are difference. hthese champions are difference. othese champions are difference. wthese champions are difference. these champions area difference. my mantra? trust your instincts to make the call. to treat my low testosterone, my doctor and i went with axiron, the only underar
coverage of what is happening in the world as well as what is happening in america. from here is a call next alabama. welcome. walter, are you there? you're on the air. i had a brother served in vietnam. realize like going into a rack them of the women, and putting our boys over there and women and the people here were calling in criticizing. if they would take a gun and do something like that, it is different. if it were not for our armed forces, we would be controlled by other countries. just like in the united states, these folk who rob banks or stuff and this that going on all the time. ain't none of us perfect, but i think our soldiers are doing a good job. media,o you think the the usb then, does a good job of covering our efforts in afghanistan and before that to my iraq? host: i sure do. i sure do.ler: host: go ahead. i am a former korean, vietnam veteran, and to make -- to me, the meeting is you have two efferent sides of the story from different angles. i tend to go to the foreign media to see what they think of us. at the same time, i think the lady talked about looking at wh
money real. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? it drives discussion across america. share your story on tv and online. >> welcome back. these are our top stories at this hour. syrian rebels are accusing the government of launching a nerve gas attack they say killed hundreds, including children. the alleged attack comes hours after a team of u.n. weapons experts arrived in damascus to investigate previous attacks. >> bradley ma
, i think we could not be in a much better place than america to have this discussion right now. i am joined by a fabulous panel of experts. usy are going to enlighten and him pack the relationship between growth in texas. many have probably seen him on tv. it ordered member of the wall street journal, he writes about immigration, taxes, many things. i am sure you have read his articles. he has been an advocate for years, a scholar, and we are privileged to have you here, steve. thank you for coming. youthing you do well is look state-by-state a lot. you talk about growth and you look at the state and evidence. and what are growing role are immigrants playing in the country? >> first of all, when amity called me and asked me to come here to dallas to speak, i leapt amthe opportunity, because i an admirer of george w. bush. thank you for the invitation. thunder a little bit when you talk about four percent growth year it i would add to what you said, that i do not think we can accomplish four percent growth without immigration. it is a precondition to get to that higher growth rate. it
africa, central and latin america and a majority of asia and discusses the possibilities for an alternative system to emerge. this is about two hours. >> okay. thank you, max. thanks to the brecht forum for hosting us, thanks to all of you for coming out. i am andy, i'm an editor at verso books, and we are the proud publishers of vijay's new book, "poorer nations." i'm going to just briefly introduce vijay. he's going to talk about his book for a bit, then we're going to have a q&a. i'll kick it off with a few questions, then we're going to turn it over to you. and as max said, we have to -- we're hoping to, you know, wait for the mic to get to you, and this is going to be recorded, it'll play on booktv on c-span at some point in the future, which is exciting. i get the feeling that a lot of people here know vijay, but just for those who don't, a little bit of bio about vijay prashad. vijay is the edward saed chair, very appropriate, at the american university of beirut right now. he was formerly and for a long time the george and martha kellner chair of south asian studi
" bankht an intern for bank of america found dead after working nearly three straight days. police a defense lawyer says the jury is stacked against this teenager who is charged with shooting a baby between the eyes right in front of his mother. >> i can't believe that they could shoot a baby in the face. >> shepard: the defense claims the accused killer is not getting a fair trial. >> one black male on a panel of 48 people. >> shepard: tonight, the push to start over and the ruling from a judge. plus police say three teenagers were bored so they decided to cale college student for fun. >> it was well thought out. >> something -- >> >> shepard: we will hear from the mother of one of the suspects. and high school students claim they are uncovered an oreo ripoff. >> it looks like the stuffing on the double stuff is slightly less than a real double stuff oreo. >> double stuff is less than oreo. >> tonight the cookie company responds. but first from fox this tuesday night. a 21-year-old intern at bank of america collapsed and died after he reportedly worked three back-to-back shifts of
branch on powell street in san francisco. next month they reportedly hit the bank of america on this street pictures from the security camera there. again, the same mo where the robbers take over the bank jump over the counter and commit the robbery by gun point. last thursday the fbi says the robber took over the first republic bank on geary. agency also looking for a second bank robber. they dub this man the up close bandit because of the clarity of the security video. they believe he's hit at least 2 banks. so far he hasn't been as violent as the high jumper. >> simulating as if he has a weapon underneath his clothing. never displays the weapon. if i'm not mistaken he utahizes a note. >> fbi says since october of last year they have had 160 bank robbery if san francisco jurisdiction and that is from the oregon border all the way south to monterey. and that's an increase from the same time last year. they have also seen a pattern developing in these bank robbery not only in the commercial districts but also in shopping centers. vick lee, 7 news. >> livermore police
far. >>> those are the headlines at that hour. "america tonight" is next on al jazeera. i'll see you back here at 11:00 eastern time, 8 pacific. ♪ >>> on "america tonight," building the case for action against syria, u.s. forces stand ready to go now what is next? >>> a spike in temperatures forces a time-out. the hid endangers for young athletes, and what can save them. >> we helped him up and started walking back to school, and the fell once again. >>> and timeless words scrawled on scraps, how the letter from birmingham jail lead to a revolutionary moment in american history. >> the letter was a call to the national conscious of america. ♪ >>> and good evening. thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. a showdown looms with washington tonight that western powers are gearing up for some kind of military strike against the government of bashar al-assad. tell us what all of this means. and what is going to happen next? >> the white house insists that the president has not yet made a decision to go ahead with military strikes. you would not know that from the rhetoric with -- from
, this point in time for america to start to lead -- this president to lead. to come before congress and get the approval of congress to do this, he should be able to make this case, i think if he tries to make it, he'll get the boot from congress. >> thank you for being with us. appreciate it, joining me with reaction to this developing story. ann coulter is with us. two big questions i have here. if they're not going for regime change, we have two big questions before us, number one, we have the israelis. now, if iran and syria are saying if they get a cruise missile attack, they're going to attack israel. is the president prepared to defend them? >> no. >> and number two. >> let's start with that one. >> wait a minute. we have to consider that. and what's the point then of lobbying missiles -- >> it's very depressing talking about foreign policy, whenever a democrat is president, because they don't care about america's national intraspective. that should be the only concern the man makes -- by the way, i don't think the president does have to go to congress to bomb someone. he's the comma
at this point in time in america. >> she is not political, she is not speaking out politically the way that abigail did with her husband. she is not a public political figure speaking out on these things. she has her own private views on some things. her views on politics are more about how people behaved. she is much more interested in everyone conducting themselves properly. even people on her own side. she doesn't like it when people who support the policies that her husband supported have crossed a line in terms of decorum. she is not trying to get out -- she's not an activist. i would not want to say that. >> nearly 100 years until women have the right to vote, we should point out for our younger viewers. what role could they play? where did their power come from? >> there is a coda to this story. just as john quincy became more and more outspoken in his opposition to slavery, and famously played a role in the amistad case. there was something between louisa and the green key sisters, who were pioneering activists and abolitionists of their day. i think she comes as close there as
... [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google and the world brain. >> the horrors of solitary confinement in prison on movies and television, on shawshank redemption, and hbo's oz. whatever it's called, with he all know it's a place you don't want to go. >> i want to protect you. ple you out of that one bunk and cast you out with the sodomites. >> to take a closer look at solitary, and why more than 80,000 inmates find themselves there, dolores, she's from anaheim, california, and she's the mother of john martinez, convicted in 1992 of second-degree murder, and he has spent the last years in solitary confinement in pellic an bay. and richard macnamara, a corrections officer at
solutions in a wide range of industries. >> andan we do for you? now, "bbc world news america." london, i'm from kathy k. the u.s. issues a global travel same al qaedathe threats that will close many american embassies on sunday. iran gets ready for an rouhani.tion of a son -- afghanistan's most first -- first female airplane pilot. >> welcome to our viewers. today the united states issued a global travel alert, citing an al qaeda threat. promptingsame thread the state department to close 21 of its embassies and consulates this sunday, mainly in the muslim world. according to officials, the challenge a potential terrorism is greatest in the middle east and north africa. unrest continues to rattle that region. i spoke with michael singer, a former director of middle east affairs at the white house national security council. you have been in the room when these decisions are made. what is it, the alert of this nature? >> as a government you have information that comes across the radar, which is serious and credible. you are under an obligation to share it publicly. it seems like
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for sony pictures, classic, now presenting "lou jasmine"- blue and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use her expertise. we offer expertise and a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. president obama says the alleged chemical attack in syria is a big event of grave concern but the british take it a step further. course we do believe that this is a chemical attack by the assad regime on a large scale. >> 40 people are killed and hundreds wounded after two car explosions ripped through the lebanese city of tripoli. one photographer shows us the many ways in which martin luther king is portrayed across the u.s.. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and all and around the globe. a big event of grave concern, tha
>> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. president obama says the alleged chemical attack in syria is a big event of grave concern but the british take it a step further. course we do believe that this is a chemical attack by the assad regime on a large scale. >> 40 people are killed and hundreds wounded after two car explosions ripped through the lebanese city of tripoli. one photographer shows us the many ways in which martin luther king is portrayed across the u.s.. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and all and around the globe. a big event of grave concern, that is how president obama has described the alleged chemical attack outside of damascus earlier this week. the british foreign secretary has said in no uncertain terms that his government leaves that syrian regime attacked its own people. even russia has joined calls for leading you when inspectors investigate. letting you when .nvestigators in >> treating the injured from the alleged chemical attack in the damascus suburbs. adults and children, frantic medical workers. still u
. are what the latest polls. a small percentage want their president to act, but about 60% say america should not stay away -- i mean, it should stay away civil war in syria. but there is a statement that obama should do more for the rebels then just send them on, while almost 80%, i should say 90% to not want america to help the opposition. meanwhile, the medical charity doctors without borders say they received more than 3000 patients suffering when the chemical assault happened. 350 people died, but who was behind the attack is still hard to verify. this is the rebel group saying they have got their largest shipment of weapons in the past three days, with the u.s. military buildup in the region. one man says this is not a coincidence. >> we have to see these elements as connected, as related to each other, as a strategy to try to reverse the course that the war has taken, where the government has made very significant gains, and to try to stifle the effort to bring down the independent government of syria. there are a lot of weapons out there in the world. there are rebel groups at this po
has an official challenger in the america's cup. that's straight ahead. >>> also strong words from syria. what officials are saying about a chemical weapons attack and the harsh warning for the u.s. >>> and the latest local target and protes >>> displaying large rainbow flags, a group in san francisco protested russia's law banning what the country calls gay propaganda. the group gays without borders picketed st. nicholas orthodox church in the castro. they want a dialogue with the church. no one at the church could be reached for comment. >>> anti-government rebels claim 300 people died after a toxic gas attack last week. the white house says there is, quote, very little doubt that syria used chemical weapons against its own citizens. syria's deputy foreign minister denies it. >> this is a big lie. and in syria we have a responsible government, but at the same time we have irresponsible enemies. >> the syrian government accuses rebels of the attack and warn the united states not to launch any military action saying such a move would set the middle east ablaze. president obama is l
our talented military spouses. after everything you've done for america, every american ought to be doing something to support your families. as this time of war ends, some of you will be taking off the uniform and returning to civilian life. and just as we gave you the tools to succeed on the battlefield, i want to make sure we're giving you the tools to succeed in the next stage of your lives as well. so we've improved transition assistance to help you find the job that's worthy of your skills. we're helping you and your families pursue your education under the post-9/11 g.i. bill and making sure instead of off, schools that give you the education you paid for are being held accountable. we're making sure more states and more industries are recognizing your military skills with licenses and credentials you need for a civilian job. when i first came into office, i was meeting medics who had been treating folks on the battlefield and when they went back to school because they wanted to be a nurse, they had to start all over again at nursing 101. and here they are, dealing with
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
. but parole. within eight years he could be eligible. this person did america a favor by helping out our droops out of iraq and afghanistan, reporting the wars weren't going anywhere as well as the president wanted to us do be. just just like daniel in vietnam and he needs our thanks. >> you recognize size the other side of that as well. >> you couldn't run a government if people were allowed to make these jump little, if we have good internal systems for whistle blowing and a system where you could get off, make it a defense that it was in the public interest. >> thank you for being with us, the senior managing attorney at the certainty for constitutional right here in new york. good to talk to you. flesh. >> you are thanks for having me. >> wild fires burning in the west are now threatening a national treasure. in northern california, a 25 square mile fire is out of control nereo sim at this national park. more than 50 fires are threatening people and property across at least 10 western states, the national i want agency fire center is now at its highest state of alert. that has not ha
to as the forgotten war. because most all of the world knew about the importance of america being involved in saving emocracy in world war ii and vietnam. good or bad, people knew people that went there. but somehow in the middle of that, no one really missed us or knew where korea was or didn't appear that there was too much concern. d when we did return, unlike the vietnam veterans who really unfairly had been treated so unkind, fortunately for us, we were never missed except by our family and friends, people never they here we were and to us. weren't as kind veterans turned out from all over. comrades that were part of the 20 countries that were part of the united nations. and when north koreans invaded south korea, those of us who were called to go to south korea to defend them, we were going to a country that we never knew to fight for a people that we never met, for causes that were not well known. having said all of that, at the conclusion, and the war has never really been called a war, it still is a division between these people, but as a result of the united states and united nations' effo
and methods. i do think this is not a partisan issue. come play sen see is america's biggest enemy. al-qaeda knows that. and so if we have to be vigilant for -- vigilance doesn't stop after a month. an interesting thing from a foreign policy aspect is is president obama responsible for al-qaeda's morphine and evolution? >> i don't know about that. >> maybe it is not. >> i know one of the reasons for the increased chatter here is a lot of these prisoners have escaped from where we have been holding them, and we have been releasing a lot of them. they had the abu ghraib released. and in afghanistan we have a program where we pay militants to leave the battlefield. they get to keep their guns. they just have to sign on the dotett line and we hillary integrate into the -- we will reintegrate into the community. >> on sundays everybody knows i like to watch the sunday shows. here is a mantage of the terror threat. >> is the threat to blowup an embassy, a consulate or something else? >> that part is unspecified. the intent seems clear. >> the intent is to what? >> it is to attack western and
targets were in the arab world and in africa, there could also be attacks in europe or north america. now, if it is a global travel alert, then it isn't really a travel, but rather an existence alert. the public announcement had all the hallmarks of the old color-coded alerts of the bush era. threatening enough to make people anxious and vague enough to give them little to do about it. but what about al qaeda? well, al qaeda central, the organization centered in afghanistan and pakistan, is in fact battered and broke. but the idea of al qaeda remains vibrant in some other places. not, as it turns out, in the great hot beds of islamic radicalism such as saudi arabia, but rather in places where the government is so weak it simply cannot control its own territory. yemen, somalia, mali, northern nigeria. so what kind of strategy should the united states pursue against these very small groups in very weak states? there are three possible paths. the first would be a more full bore counterinsurgency strategy, the kind that general david petraeus executed in iraq and to a lesser degree in afghani
voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> welcome back, everyone, for more on the bales and hassan cases we're joined by jeffrey s. corn, a professor of law. good to talk to you. let me set this it up for you and have you take it on. you have two cases here, two soldiers, both guilty of multiple killings of innocence. one kills american soldiers and the other kills afghan civilians. the one who kills american civilians could be put to death. the one who kills afghans is allowed to enter a plea arrangement to avoid the death penalty. are the two men being treated differently because of who they killed? >> in my opinion the answer to that is no. i know that's been one of the criticisms that's been made over these two cases, but the way i look at this is that the evidence of the massacre at fort hood supports the conclusion that major hassan's crimes were much more depraved
process, but considering the breadth of america's economy and where we've been and how we have we've recovered, there's something wrong with the recovery of this recession and it's just not living up to its potential. >> well, actually, it's not as weird as you think. if you look at reinhart and the arguments from a couple of years ago, it's following the track that they said, when you have the debt-caused recessions, it's hard to get out of them. you can't afford to spend out of them. >> i see wal-mart down in earnings and macy's, cisco down on earnings and to me, it suggests a lot of problems throughout all parts of the economy. how do we turn them around? i don't know that we can afford to just bump along the way we have been. >> i'm not sure we've got an alternative. it would be good if you've got strong action from washington and fix some of our problems, that's not going to happen and get them to agree on anything. >> give me an example of some of that, quote, strong action. >> number one, we've got to do something about the long-term deficit problem in the country. we've pr
to this week in the americas. the u.s. army private bradley man in, what impact did the whistle blower have on america abroad? and negotiating with the colombian rebel group. and the villagers that take on the drug cartels. but first, viewed as a hero by some and a traitor by others, a soldier who blew the whistle on america's military and diplomatic secrets, found guilty of espionage and theft charges, but acquitted of aiding the enemy. >> when carrying out the air raid on baghdad in 2007, these pilots could not have imagined the video would one day be made public. the footage showing the killing of journalists and several other civilians sparking controversy. this is among the data and over by bradley manning and he has been convicted for it. they released a series of top- secret documents just as damaging. hundreds of thousands of diplomatic cables. >> the battlefield consequences are potentially severe and dangerous for our troops, allies, partners, and they will damage our relationships in debt -- a reputation in that part of the world. >> it is clear enemies of the u.s. will take care
in the united states of america. i'm going to to be focused on that particular issue. right now what i needed to do is to make sure schools on on time and safely. not withstand something of the personnel reductions. the focus has to be on education, young people, what goes on in school, after school, on the weekends, during the summer, and so we beefed up many of our after-school programs as well as summer programming to make sure our kids are safe and they are learning and they are working with caring, nurturing adults. >> okay. mayor landrieu, i want to get this school question out of the way as well. i want to talk about -- specifically about other things. i want to ask the same question. as new orleans is building a new prison, is this our new reality? giving up on schools to make room for teens who will inevitably end up behind bars? >> you know, it is one of the things that we face in this nation. we are bogey to have cadillac prisons and not have schools that work. we have to get priorities right. you are never getting to the issue and mayor nutter and i want to talk about tonight. whi
>> this is bbc world news america. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu,newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. >> andan we do for you? now, "bbc world news america." london, i'm from kathy k. the u.s. issues a global travel same al qaedathe threats that will close many american embassies on sunday. iran gets ready for an rouhani.tion of a son -- afghanistan's most first -- first female airplane pilot. >> welcome to our viewers. today the united states issued a global travel alert, citing an al qaeda threat. promptingsame thread the state department to close 21 of its embassies and consulates this sunday, mainly in the muslim world. according to officials, the challenge a po
when you come right down to it, the united states of america's population is not going to buy into these stories that he spins out about the violation of a constitution. christie is there to tell you buildings were burning in new york. people were jumping out of windows. we have to protect ourselves. >> and growing opposition to the surveillance the nsa. rand paul is tapping some public sentiment. not just on the left. we had a vote in congress. a republican congress from michigan sponsoring an amendment that almost gutted the nsa collection of meta data. it failed 217-205. very close. so is dorothy right about the politics? >> i really would like to think dorothy's right about this and i'd like to think chris christie is right. i worry a little bit that 9/11, all of that, is becoming a new york/new jersey/connecticut thing. those of us who experienced it that day. and it is essentially receding out perhaps in parts of the country and becoming something of a distraction. because the united states has been lucky, unlike capitals in europe, not to experience another terrorist ev
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